Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit

Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit

The water contamination at Camp Lejeune is a devastating environmental disaster that has impacted the lives of thousands of Marines, their families, and civilian employees.

The United States government has failed to address the health concerns of these individuals adequately and has dragged its feet in providing compensation for those who have been injured.

camp lejeune water contamination lawsuit

It is time for the government to do right by the Marines and their relatives who have been severely impacted by this tragedy.

They deserve to be compensated for their injuries, and the government must be held accountable for its failure to protect them.

This article will provide a more detailed overview of the water contamination case at Camp Lejeune and the legal options that are available to those who have been impacted.

Table of Contents

Lawsuit Updates

  • July 12, 2024 Update:

    July 12, 2024:

    The deadline for submitting claims under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act is rapidly approaching. 

    Veterans and their families who were exposed to toxic water at the Marine Corps base from 1953 to 1987 must file their claims by August 10 to seek compensation for related health conditions.

    Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C., has been associated with severe health issues due to water contamination with cancer-causing chemicals.

    The federal government has acknowledged this exposure, and the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, enacted in 2022, permits affected individuals to seek compensation.

    Key Deadline Information:

    • Claim Requirements: Individuals must have been exposed to Camp Lejeune water for at least 30 days and diagnosed with a qualifying health condition before the law was enacted.
    • Deadline: Claims must be submitted to the Department of the Navy by August 10.
    • Number of Claims: Over 260,000 claims have been filed, with more than $14.7 million paid out.
    • Future Claims: The Act does not cover future diagnoses, making the deadline critical for those currently eligible.

    Many victims and advocates encourage eligible individuals to act quickly to secure their right to compensation.

    Contact the lawyers at TruLaw today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10, 2024. 

    Contact us today to see if you qualify to file a claim.

    July 10, 2024:

    The federal court has transferred a dispute involving the National Academy of Sciences to the Eastern District of North Carolina (E.D.N.C.), the court handling the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit.

    The Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group (PLG) issued a subpoena to the Academy for information about a 2009 report on water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    Details of the subpoena include:

    • PLG served a Rule 45 subpoena on the Academy, seeking information related to a 2009 report on water contamination at Camp Lejeune.
    • The Academy produced 200,000 pages but withheld documents related to internal deliberations.
    • The Academy filed a motion to quash or alter the subpoena, and PLG filed a motion to transfer this motion to the E.D.N.C.

    The court ruled that transferring the dispute to the E.D.N.C. would keep the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination litigation organized, given the E.D.N.C. court’s familiarity with the case details.

    This transfer will not burden the Academy, as telecommunication methods and existing legal representation will facilitate the process.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10th, 2024.

    Our lawyers are still accepting new clients.

    Contact our Camp Lejeune Lawyers today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to find out if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune claim instantly.

  • June 13, 2024 Update:

    June 13, 2024

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    The court has sanctioned a joint motion to select specific plaintiffs for the first trials concerning the historic water contamination.

    The initial batch of five lawsuits will concentrate on claimants afflicted with serious health conditions such as kidney cancer, bladder cancer, leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and Parkinson’s Disease.

    Per the court’s directive, plaintiffs’ attorneys are tasked with selecting three cases to proceed to trial by June 16.

    This selection mechanism is intended to expedite the trial process for those most adversely affected by the contamination.

    These initial trials are anticipated to set legal precedents for numerous other similar claims associated with the Camp Lejeune water contamination event.

    This methodical approach is essential for addressing the large volume of claims due to long-term exposure to hazardous substances in Camp Lejeune’s water supply.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10th, 2024. 

    Our lawyers are still accepting new clients. 

    Contact our Camp Lejeune Lawyers today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to find out if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune claim instantly.

    June 12, 2024

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    The court recently addressed several key motions concerning the water contamination at Camp Lejeune, associated with increased risks of specific leukemias, lymphomas, and cancers affecting the lung, breast, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, and soft tissues.

    During a status conference, multiple motions were withdrawn by both the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group (PLG) and the United States, including:

    • The PLG’s Motion to Compel Document Production following their initial request.
    • The United States’ Cross-Motion for a Protective Order.
    • The PLG’s Motion to Reconsider the denial of their motion to compel the production of certain digitized muster rolls.
    • The PLG’s Motion to Reconsider the decision that both granted and denied their motion to compel production of the ATSDR Water Modeling Project File in its native format.

    These withdrawals indicate shifting dynamics in the management of this complex case. Furthermore, the court dismissed the United States’ attempt to block the deposition of Dr. Christopher Portier, former Director of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), despite logistical challenges related to his deposition in Italy due to health issues.

    The litigation continues to depend on the ATSDR’s historical contamination models, even though their accuracy has been challenged by a report from the National Research Council (NRC).

    These models are crucial for claimants to demonstrate the extent of exposure to hazardous chemicals like TCE and PCE, and to establish causation.

    The outcomes of these procedural motions and the forthcoming depositions are likely to influence the course of the many individual cases consolidated in this significant litigation.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10th, 2024. 

    Our lawyers are still accepting new clients. 

    Contact our Camp Lejeune Lawyers today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to find out if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune claim instantly.

    June 6, 2024

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    As of June 4, 2024, a federal court in North Carolina has finalized 58 settlements totaling $14.4 million related to these longstanding environmental issues.

    The resolved claims involve serious health conditions, including bladder and kidney cancers as well as lymphoma, attributed to exposure to water contaminated with high levels of chlorinated solvents and other pollutants from 1953 to 1987.

    To date, there have been 1,813 lawsuits filed individually, and the Department of the Navy has processed 232,892 administrative claims regarding this contamination.

    Out of these, 93 claimants have qualified for settlements, with 33 offers from the Navy and 25 from the U.S. Department of Justice being accepted.

    Judges in the Eastern District of North Carolina have adhered to a rigorous causation standard required by the 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, dismissing requests for a more flexible causation criterion.

    This legislation, significant for enabling veterans and their relatives to pursue compensation from the government, also introduced a controversial two-year deadline for claim submissions.

    This deadline has been a point of contention, with accusations from veterans that the government delayed the release of water contamination data until after the statute of limitations had lapsed.

    Recent judicial decisions have rejected service members’ requests for jury trials, with the courts preparing to proceed with bench trials instead.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10th, 2024. 

    Our lawyers are still accepting new clients. 

    Contact our Camp Lejeune Lawyers today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to find out if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune claim instantly.

    June 3, 2024

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    On June 3, 2024, the Camp Lejeune Water Lawsuit took a significant step forward as the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group and the United States established a selection protocol for the first bellwether trials.

    This procedure targets 25 plaintiffs from the Track 1 Discovery Pool who have severe health conditions, including kidney cancer, bladder cancer, leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and Parkinson’s disease, attributed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

    Under this strategy, each party can nominate plaintiffs for the trials: The Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group will suggest three candidates per illness, and the United States will propose an additional two per illness.

    The selected plaintiffs will limit their claims to the specified Track 1 illnesses, thereby sharpening the focus of the trial.

    The implementation of this protocol is a critical development in the litigation, promoting efficient resource allocation to the most critical cases.

    This is anticipated to streamline the trial process, minimize expenses, and concentrate legal efforts.

    The completion of discovery for these plaintiffs is set for 45 days after securing the necessary waivers, with a schedule for expert discovery to be determined following the trial order.

    The deadline to file a Camp Lejeune claim is August 10th, 2024. 

    Our lawyers are still accepting new clients. 

    Contact our Camp Lejeune Lawyers today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to find out if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune claim instantly.

  • May 30, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    Currently, the Plaintiff’s Leadership Group (PLG) is contesting the United States’ attempt to block Dr. Christopher Portier from deposition. Dr. Portier, previously the Director of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), is considered a crucial witness due to his role in identifying the health risks associated with the water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    Under Dr. Portier’s leadership, ATSDR research connected the exposure to the base’s contaminated water to elevated instances of cancer and neurological disorders.

    The importance of Dr. Portier’s deposition lies in its potential to counteract the government’s defense strategy.

    The government has attempted to cast doubt on the ATSDR’s findings by promoting a study from the National Academy of Sciences’ National Research Council (NRC), which challenged the methods used by the ATSDR.

    The U.S. government claims that Dr. Portier’s testimony is unnecessary, pointing out that the testimonies of other key scientists, such as Dr. Frank Bove and Morris Maslia, are yet to occur and might render Dr. Portier’s deposition redundant.

    Moreover, the government cites the logistical difficulties and financial burden of conducting Dr. Portier’s deposition in Italy, where he currently resides.

    They have invoked Rule 26(c) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which allows the issuance of a protective order to avoid undue burden during discovery.

    In response, the PLG argues that Dr. Portier’s insights are unique and vital due to his direct involvement and leadership in the significant health studies at the ATSDR.

    They maintain that his testimony is crucial to effectively challenge the government’s reliance on the NRC report.

    To address the issue of conducting the deposition abroad, the PLG assures compliance with all legal protocols for international depositions and proposes cost-effective measures such as remote participation.

    The PLG is also disputing the government’s motion for a protective order, emphasizing that the government has not met the specific requirements of Rule 26(c) to justify such an order based on the supposed irrelevance and burdensome nature of the deposition.

    The PLG is requesting that the court deny the government’s protective order, reinforcing the significance of Dr. Portier’s testimony to their case.

    The filing deadline for a Camp Lejeune claim is set for August 10, 2024.

    Our Camp Lejeune lawyers are still accepting new clients. 

    Reach out to our Camp Lejeune Lawyers for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to instantly determine if you qualify for a Camp Lejeune lawsuit.

  • May 13, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing.

    On May 13, 2024, the Eastern District of North Carolina issued a ruling affirming its February 6 decision under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act (CLJA), denying the option for jury trials for plaintiffs involved in the Camp Lejeune Water Lawsuit.

    The court dismissed the Plaintiff’s Leadership Group (PLG) request to revisit the decision that jury trials are not permissible under the CLJA.

    Challenges have arisen in the evidence handling, especially concerning the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s (ATSDR) water modeling project files.

    The court allowed the PLG limited access to produce these files in their original formats but declined the request for a complete “mirror image” of all modeling files.

    This limitation has impacted the PLG’s ability to verify the reconstructed water models’ accuracy.

    The ruling shows the court’s stance that appeals prior to a case’s final resolution should be reserved for exceptional circumstances, not finding the lack of jury trials under CLJA as such.

    The absence of jury trials in the Camp Lejeune Water Lawsuit may influence both the calculation of settlements and the strategic approaches in upcoming legal actions.

    Plaintiffs now must wait until the final resolution of their cases before they can appeal the decision on jury trials.

  • May 1, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune lawsuit is ongoing. 

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit progresses as the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group (PLG) files a motion for partial summary judgment under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act (CLJA).

    This critical legal step addresses key procedural issues and the definition of “legal representatives” for deceased victims of toxic exposure from 1953 to 1987.

    Specifically, the PLG requests judicial guidance to expand the recognition of individuals eligible to act as legal representatives under the CLJA.

    The proposed change would facilitate the appointment of representatives in claims involving deceased victims, potentially speeding up the legal process by eliminating the need to reopen estates, particularly in Onslow County where Camp Lejeune is located.

    In response, the government emphasizes the challenge of processing claims linked to multiple diseases from Camp Lejeune water contamination.

    It suggests prioritizing cases involving single disease claims to streamline case management and advance a global resolution.

    Moreover, the PLG underscores the critical nature of these clarifications with the looming deadline of August 10, 2024, for filing claims.

    They argue that the current government requirement for claimants to provide explicit proof of legal representative status introduces undue obstacles, increasing legal costs and deterring potential claimants.

    As this motion is reviewed, its outcome could significantly affect the pace at which affected families can seek compensation.

    The court’s decision will likely set a precedent for how similar claims are handled in the future, reflecting the broader impact of the Camp Lejeune water contamination issue.

    If you or a loved one was affected by the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune from 1953 to 1987, call us today for a free consultation.

    Alternatively, use the chatbot on this page for an instant Camp Lejeune case evaluation.

  • April 24, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit is advancing, and the filing deadline of August 10, 2024, for claims under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act is quickly approaching. 

    In the current phase of the Camp Lejeune Toxic Water Litigation, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina has allowed the defendant an additional 30 days to respond to the latest round of discovery requests.

    This extension is related to the Second Set of Requests for Production, Interrogatories, and Requests for Admission aimed at Track 1 Discovery Plaintiffs, focusing on various diseases associated with water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    This litigation includes over 1,700 individual lawsuits bundled under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, addressing health issues from exposure to polluted water between August 1953 and December 1987.

    A Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group and specific case management orders have been implemented to streamline the proceedings, moving the new response deadline to May 28, 2024.

    The Plaintiffs are contesting this extension as it applies to the Rule 26(e) Request, which requires parties to amend their discovery responses when they discover that provided or previously responded information is incomplete or inaccurate.

    The court’s directive does not extend the defendant’s period for supplementation; instead, it specifies that Plaintiffs may file motions as necessary to uphold earlier production requests.

    As this litigation progresses, the court’s procedural rulings play a crucial role in methodically addressing the plaintiffs’ health claims linked to exposure to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

    If you or someone you know was affected by the contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune from 1953 to 1987, you may be eligible to submit a claim. 

    Contact us or utilize the chatbot on this page to verify your eligibility for the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit instantly.

  • April 19, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit is advancing.

    In a key update concerning the Camp Lejeune toxic water litigation, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina has revised Case Management Order No. 2, specifically targeting the opt-out clauses that dictate plaintiff engagement in the ongoing discovery processes.

    This amendment notably restricts plaintiffs’ ability to withdraw from the Discovery Pool starting from Track 2 and in later stages, aiming to bolster both the efficiency and fairness of the proceedings.

    Per the revised order, only plaintiffs not represented by the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group are permitted to opt out of the Discovery Pool.

    These plaintiffs are required to officially declare their intention to opt out to both the Plaintiffs’ Leadership and the counsel for the United States within a 30-day window after their Complaint is filed.

    This change aims to minimize the broad use of the opt-out option, which was previously perceived as a barrier to progressing the litigation.

    The order further clarifies that plaintiffs who have opted out of Track 2 but are represented by a member of the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group are still deemed eligible for inclusion in the Track 2 Discovery Pool.

    Additionally, the court has denied the United States’ petition for more time on the Plaintiffs’ Request for Supplementation, emphasizing the necessity for prompt compliance.

    The United States is obliged to quickly update its discovery responses, specifically concerning document requests numbered 18, 19, and 20, originally submitted on October 4, 2023.

    The Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group (PLG) and the United States have agreed on protocols for obtaining and distributing crucial medical and Social Security records of plaintiffs in the Track 1 Discovery Pool.

    This process involves the use of HIPAA-compliant forms for accessing private third-party medical records and Social Security Administration SSA-7050-F4 forms for social security earnings data.

    Moreover, the United States has initiated a motion requesting the court to reassess its prior decision to retain the opt-out provision for upcoming phases.

    This motion advocates for a more restrictive opt-out policy to maintain the litigation’s continuity and integrity.

    The United States Government argues that such steps are essential to ensure that all plaintiffs are actively involved and qualified for selection in discovery pools.

    These recent developments and motions suggest a significant shift in the handling of the Camp Lejeune Lawsuits in the Eastern District of North Carolina, potentially influencing both plaintiff participation and the strategic direction of the litigation.

    Reach out to us today for a free consultation, or utilize the chatbot on this page for an immediate Camp Lejeune case evaluation.

  • April 9, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit is progressing.

    The federal government has recommended to a federal court in North Carolina that cases involving plaintiffs with a single specific disease linked to water contamination—such as bladder cancer, kidney cancer, leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, or Parkinson’s disease—be prioritized in trials.

    This approach is intended to make the legal proceedings more efficient and quick, as these cases are typically less complicated than those involving multiple diseases, which require more extensive expert testimony.

    Reports indicate that nearly 1,500 lawsuits claim that from 1953 to 1987, exposure to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune led to severe health issues due to elevated levels of toxic chemicals.

    Prioritizing cases with single-disease claims may expedite justice for those impacted.

    The attorneys representing the plaintiffs are appealing a ruling that denied their request for a jury trial, contending that the interpretation of the Camp Lejeune Justice Act by the court needs to be reassessed.

    Our firm continues to welcome new clients who have been affected by the water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    We are committed to providing legal assistance to those seeking compensation for their health problems.

    Reach out to us today for a free consultation, or use the chatbot on this page to instantly assess your eligibility for the Camp Lejeune lawsuit.

  • April 8, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit is making headway.

    On April 8, 2024, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina revised the procedural rules for the Camp Lejeune Water Litigation, particularly impacting Track 1 plaintiffs.

    A “Track 1 Plaintiff” refers to a specific group within the larger lawsuit, identified by their similar legal issues or less complex claims that can be resolved more swiftly.

    In this lawsuit, Track 1 plaintiffs are those who claim to have contracted specific illnesses as a direct result of the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

    Per the court’s latest directive, labeled as Document 167-6, Track 1 plaintiffs are categorized into two groups: Single Disease Plaintiffs and Multiple Disease Plaintiffs.

    Trials involving Multiple Disease Plaintiffs, who report various ailments linked to the contaminated water, are set to occur after those involving Single Disease Plaintiffs.

    The expert discovery phase for Multiple Disease Plaintiffs will be delayed until after the Single Disease Plaintiff trials are concluded.

    This delay is designed to adequately prepare for and address the intricate issues associated with claims involving multiple diseases.

    The court is expected to set a timeline for expert discovery for Multiple Disease Plaintiffs in a forthcoming order.

    If you or someone you care about has been impacted by the water contamination at Camp Lejeune, please reach out to us today for a free consultation.

    You may also use the chatbot on this page for an immediate assessment of your Camp Lejeune Lawsuit eligibility.

  • March 28, 2024 Update:

    The legal actions related to the Camp Lejeune lawsuit are currently underway.

    The deadline to submit administrative claims or lawsuits under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act is set for August 10, 2024.

    Eligibility for participating in the lawsuit extends to military veterans, their family members, and civilian employees who encountered the contaminated water at the base for at least 30 days between 1953 and 1987.

    A specific clause in the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, established by the Navy and the Justice Department, expedites the settlement process for certain health conditions believed to be caused by the water contamination.

    The conditions recognized for expedited processing are divided into:

    Tier 1 Injuries:

    • Kidney Cancer
    • Liver Cancer
    • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
    • Leukemia
    • Bladder Cancer

    Tier 2 Injuries:

    • Multiple Myeloma
    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Kidney Disease/End-Stage Renal Disease
    • Systemic Sclerosis/Systemic Scleroderma

    For non-elective settlements and legal claims, proof must not only establish exposure to the contaminated water but must also demonstrate a direct link between that exposure and the resulting injury.

    Our law firm continues to welcome new cases linked to the Camp Lejeune lawsuit from eligible military veterans, their families, and civilian workers who were exposed to the contaminated water.

    Reach out to us today for a free consultation, or use our chatbot available on this page for immediate assistance.

  • March 26, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit is actively proceeding.

    Our legal team continues to assist clients with their Camp Lejeune claims amidst the ongoing litigation.

    A Joint Status Report released on March 12th reveals that 1,633 Camp Lejeune Lawsuits have been initiated in the US District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina.

    This report also indicates that a total of 174,891 administrative claims have been submitted.

    It further details that the involved parties are nearing the completion of establishing a method for bellwether selection, which involves choosing a representative set of cases from the larger pool for early trial.

    The outcomes of these initial “bellwether” trials are crucial as they can provide insights into trends within the broader set of cases, possibly influencing future litigation strategies or settlement discussions.

    Additionally, the report mentions the court’s plan to convene a status conference in the upcoming month to delve into case management issues and the process of selecting bellwether cases.

    The process for filing Camp Lejeune claims is in progress, with the filing deadline set for August 10th, 2024.

    In spite of the significant number of cases and claims, both the attorneys and the court are diligently working towards managing the litigation effectively.

    If you were exposed to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune between 1953 and 1987, you might have grounds for a claim.

    Reach out to our law firm today or utilize the chatbot on our website for a prompt case assessment.

  • March 12, 2024 Update:

    The ongoing legal battle related to Camp Lejeune has seen recent developments. 

    On March 12th, the Eastern District Court of North Carolina ruled in a manner that benefits the plaintiffs.

    This ruling requires the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to hand over its Water Modeling Project File in its untouched format.

    Such modeling is pivotal for ATSDR to accurately replicate the water system’s state at Camp Lejeune before March 1987, which is essential to identify the specific areas and times when the drinking water was contaminated with Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

    This legal action is part of a larger collection of over 1,500 lawsuits filed under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which addresses the health impacts from exposure to tainted water at the base between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987.

    A major point of dispute was the manner in which the Modeling Files should be delivered.

    Plaintiffs argued that altering the files from their original format would remove their inherent structure, including folders, subfolders, and crucial cross-references, thus diminishing their value.

    It was specifically pointed out that changing the format of Geographic Information System (GIS) and water modeling files could result in a loss of functionality.

    Acknowledging this concern, the defense admitted that standard Electronic Stored Information (ESI) processing might not adequately conserve some modeling files.

    Consequently, they agreed to supply the necessary files in their original form when required.

    The court ordered that these vital Modeling Files must be provided in their original, structured format to preserve their utility and integrity for the case.

    This ruling highlights the need for a flexible approach to managing ESI standards to ensure that such materials remain useful and relevant in legal contexts.

    Individuals who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune for a minimum of 30 days from 1953 to 1987 may be eligible to file a claim related to the base’s water contamination. 

    For those interested in a free consultation or to instantly verify eligibility for filing a claim, reaching out to our legal team or using the provided chatbot on this webpage is advised.

  • February 27, 2024 Update:

    The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit continues to unfold

    On February 26, 2024, key documents were filed in the Eastern District of North Carolina to advance and organize the Camp Lejeune Lawsuit.

    The Track 2 Discovery Plan Order (CMO 9) sets up a discovery strategy for the lawsuit’s second stage.

    • Track 2 is focusing on claims of prostate cancer, kidney disease, lung cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer.
    • This strategy divides the lawsuit into illness-specific groups to make the discovery and trial phases more efficient, aiming for quicker resolutions for prevalent conditions and guiding the court’s handling and potential settlement of the numerous claims under the CLJA.

    The Proposed Order for Expert Examinations of Plaintiffs presents a consensus between the Plaintiffs’ Leadership Group (PLG) and the government.

    • This proposed order is designed to simplify discovery by letting the government waive its right to expert medical exams under certain conditions, aiming to minimize unnecessary exams.

    The Joint Motion to Amend CMO 2 Regarding Expert Examinations of Plaintiffs aims to update a prior case management order (CMO 2) to better define the expert examination procedures of plaintiffs. 

    • This amendment resolves a dispute over the notification process for these exams, aiming to eliminate previous ambiguities that could hinder the discovery process and disadvantage either party by not allowing ample time for response or preparation.

    Case Management Order No. 10 addresses a motion to alter CMO 2, partially approving and denying the suggested changes. 

    • This motion emphasizes the court’s decision to extend the Track 1 discovery period, uphold the plaintiffs’ option to opt out, and mandate all plaintiffs filed in North Carolina Federal Court to submit Short Form Complaints, while postponing the decision on medical expert examination notifications.
    • This order is vital for understanding the court’s commitment to maintaining the uniqueness of each CLJA lawsuit while seeking to orderly and swiftly process cases.

    These four court documents collectively impact the Camp Lejeune Litigation, especially for cases in the North Carolina Federal Court, by offering a systematic way to manage discovery and trial procedures.

    This is achieved through the ongoing use of “track” systems and agreed-upon orders for expert exams.

    In the short term, these actions are intended to make the proceedings more efficient and reduce bottlenecks, especially by introducing Short Form Complaints to unify claims within the North Carolina Federal Court.

    These changes aim to speed up case resolutions while preserving the distinctiveness and integrity of each plaintiff’s claim within the broader litigation structure.

    Our attorneys are still welcoming Camp Lejeune claims from those who spent at least 30 days on the Marine Corps base between 1953 and 1987.

    For a free consultation, reach out to our Camp Lejeune Lawyers, or use the chatbot on this page to instantly check if you’re eligible to file a Camp Lejeune claim.

    We’re here to assist you.

  • February 21, 2024 Update:

    On February 21, 2024, the federal government insisted that plaintiffs from Camp Lejeune need to prove their health issues were directly caused by the base’s polluted water.

    Around 1,500 cases are awaiting judgment in the Eastern District of North Carolina under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which has made it easier for those harmed by the base’s contaminated water between 1953 and 1987 to seek justice.

    The government argued that, even though Congress has relaxed the proof requirements compared to standard tort law, plaintiffs must still directly link their health problems to contaminated water.

    The government’s stance was that just showing a brief presence at the base and suffering from a related illness doesn’t meet the threshold, as it might lead to compensation without specific evidence.

    Plaintiffs are trying to link a range of health issues to the high contaminant levels in Camp Lejeune’s water.

    They maintain that the Act’s 30-day exposure minimum is in line with the legislation’s intent to simplify legal proceedings for those impacted by the hazardous water.

    Represented by a variety of legal teams, the plaintiffs are seeking compensation from the government, defended by lawyers from the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    The core of the Camp Lejeune Water Litigation v. U.S. case, being heard in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina, is the government’s insistence on a direct connection between the plaintiffs’ illnesses and the base’s polluted water.

  • February 15, 2024 Update:

    On February 14th, attorneys for the plaintiffs in the Camp Lejeune case moved to contest a prior court ruling that rejected their request for a jury trial.

    They filed a memorandum in support of their application to appeal the court’s decision, which had agreed with the defendant’s motion to dismiss the plaintiffs’ call for a jury trial.

    This step is in response to a February 6, 2024, court order that sided with the government’s argument to remove the jury trial request, based on the position that plaintiffs under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act (CLJA) are not entitled to a jury trial in lawsuits against the government.

    The plaintiffs argue that this ruling rests on a significant legal question that warrants further examination and believe that an appeal could hasten the settlement of their claims. The Plaintiff’s Leadership Group (PLG) is advocating for a quick review by a higher court of the decision to deny a jury trial.

    It’s crucial to note that this appeal is restricted to just two specific cases and does not affect other plaintiffs’ rights to appeal after a final court decision.

    This targeted appeal intends to direct the court’s attention solely to these two cases, to ensure effective trial management and the smooth progression of the broader litigation.

    The Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit is ongoing.

What is Camp Lejeune?

Camp Lejeune is a marine corps base located in North Carolina.

The base was established in 1942 and has been used for various training exercises and operations over the years.

In the 1980s, it was discovered that the water at Camp Lejeune was contaminated with harmful chemicals, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE).

These chemicals are known to cause or increase the risk of contracting a variety of health problems, including cancer.

Thousands of veterans and their loved ones have been devastated by the Camp Lejeune water contamination.

In 2014, Congress passed the Honoring Veterans and Their Families Act, which provided health care benefits to those affected by the contamination.

The Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuit is currently affecting and involving many.

If you or a family member have been impacted by the toxic water at Camp Lejeune, you may be eligible to receive compensation.

What Happened at Camp Lejeune?

The water contamination at Camp Lejeune occurred over a period of several decades, beginning in the 1950s.

The contaminated water was used for drinking, cooking, and bathing by Marines, their families, and civilian employees.

As mentioned previously, this water was contaminated with a variety of chemicals, including trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, and vinyl chloride.

Exposure to these kinds of chemicals has been linked to many serious health conditions, including cancer, kidney disease, liver disease, and more.

Thousands of people have been impacted by the contamination, and many have died as a result.

It was not until recent years that the full extent of the contamination and its health effects came to light.

What's the timeline of the Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuit?

In 1941, Camp Lejeune was set up as a Marine Corps base. The Tarawa Terrace treatment plant was created for water supply in 1951.

Unfortunately, a few years later, water inspectors knew there were contamination issues at Camp Lejeune.

By 1953, the One Hour Dry Cleaner, a dry-cleaning business located on the base, was found to be contaminating well water with dry cleaning chemicals such as PCE (perchloroethylene).

Then, by 1979 around 30,000 gallons of oil had leaked from Hadnot Point Fuel Farm, creating an oil plume below ground.

An underground oil plume is when oil seeps through the soil and gets trapped below the ground.

This can contaminate water sources like wells, and the oil plume created by the Hadnot Point Fuel Farm contaminated the Tarawa Terrace well field.

Fuel leaks such as these raise the level of toxicity in the water by introducing carcinogenic chemicals such as benzene.

Subsequently, in 1984, an external contractor discovered benzene, TCE (trichloroethylene), PCE and other volatile organic compounds present in the Hadnot Point Water Well.

Due to these findings, all Hadnot Point wells were shut down by 1985.

However, by this time, many of the residents at Camp Lejeune had already been drinking contaminated water for years.

In 1989, Camp Lejeune was declared a superfund site by the EPA. The EPA’s Superfund program is designed to clean up the nation’s most contaminated sites.

The fact that Camp Lejeune is a superfund site means that the EPA was and is currently in charge of investigating and cleaning up the contamination.

The investigation found that there were multiple sources of contamination at Camp Lejeune, including the dry cleaner, the fuel farm, and a number of leaking underground storage tanks.

The investigation also found that the Tarawa Terrace treatment plant was not properly treating the water to remove contaminants.

The EPA has been working to clean up the contamination at Camp Lejeune since the superfund designation in 1989.

In the meantime, many of the Marines and their families who were exposed to the contaminated water have filed lawsuits against the companies responsible for the contamination.

Who is the EPA, and what are superfund sites?

The EPA is the Environmental Protection Agency, which is a federal government agency that is mainly in charge of protecting human health and that of the environment.

The EPA was created in 1970 by President Richard Nixon.

Superfund sites are contaminated areas that have been designated by the EPA as needing cleanup due to the presence of hazardous substances.

There are currently 1,300 superfund sites in the United States, and Camp Lejeune is one of them.

How did the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit begin?

In 2009, victims of the contamination at Camp Lejeune began filing lawsuits against the U.S government under the Federal Tort Claims Act, proposing that they had developed illnesses ranging from cancer to kidney disease as a result of the contaminated water.

These lawsuits were eventually consolidated into a multidistrict litigation class action lawsuit, which was filed in 2012.

Marine Corps veterans and their relatives filed 800 lawsuits in 2016 related to water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

The Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuits resulted in no legal recourse for victims even by 2018, but eventually, the House of Representatives introduced the Camp Lejeune Justice Act in 2021.

The act was then added to a larger collective bill which is called the Honoring Our Pact Act in 2022, which was then passed by Congress this year.

Camp Lejeune Water Supply

The contamination of the waters at Marine Bases in Lejeune has existed for more than 30 years. Camp Lejeune’s water contamination could possibly have been the result of a dry cleaning operation located near its base. In the drying operations, improper disposal of industrial chemicals in sewage and drainage channels led to improper discharge. The chemical also affected the water at the Tarawa Terrace wastewater treatment facility and Hadnot Point. Toxica substances have been traced to water treatment plants mentioned in this document located on the Marine Corps Base.

Camp Lejeune Water Supply

The contamination of the waters at Marine Bases in Lejeune has existed for more than 30 years. Camp Lejeune’s water contamination could possibly have been the result of a dry cleaning operation located near its base. In the drying operations, improper disposal of industrial chemicals in sewage and drainage channels led to improper discharge. The chemical also affected the water at the Tarawa Terrace wastewater treatment facility and Hadnot Point. Toxica substances have been traced to water treatment plants mentioned in this document located on the Marine Corps Base.

The Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) is a law that allows private citizens to sue the United States government for personal injuries caused by the negligence of federal employees.

To bring any claim under the FTCA, plaintiffs have to initially file an administrative claim with the relevant federal agency and then go on to file a lawsuit in federal court if their claim is denied.

What’s a class action lawsuit?

Initially, the Camp Lejeune victims’ claims were grouped into a class action lawsuit.

This is a type of lawsuit where a group of plaintiffs with similar claims file one lawsuit on behalf of all members of the group.

Class action lawsuits are often used when there are many plaintiffs with relatively small individual claims.

In a class action lawsuit, the court appoints one or more of the plaintiffs (called “class representatives”) to represent the interests of all members of the class.

The class representatives must be typical of the rest of the class in terms of their claims and interests.

The class representatives and their attorneys then work together to investigate the claims and develop legal arguments.

They also negotiate with the defendants to try to reach a settlement agreement.

If a settlement is not reached, then the case will go to trial.

If the plaintiffs win at trial, each member of the class will usually receive a share of the damages awarded by the jury.

If the plaintiffs lose, each member of the class is bound by the result and cannot sue separately on their own behalf.

Class action lawsuits can be filed in state or federal court, but most are filed in federal court.

Due to the law that was passed on August 10th 2022, the Camp Lejeune lawsuit is no longer a class action lawsuit, and individuals can now make personal claims for the illnesses they suffered as a result of the water contamination.

What are the effects of the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune?

Contaminated water containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can lead to a variety of health problems, including:

  • Cancer
  • Liver damage
  • Kidney damage
  • Immune system disorders
  • Reproductive problems
  • Birth defects

These health effects can occur years or even decades after exposure to contaminated water.

In some cases, the effects may not be immediately apparent, which can make it difficult to link them to the exposure.

However, those living in Camp Lejeune and in that vicinity reported seeing an increase in cases of these health problems, particularly cancer.

VOCs are common in many chemicals, including solvents and degreasers, and can easily enter the water supply through leaks or spills.

The Marine Corps has acknowledged that VOCs were present in the water at Camp Lejeune for many years, and they likely had harmful health effects on those who were exposed.

However, they have not taken responsibility for these health problems or offered any compensation to those affected.

So, if you were stationed at Camp Lejeune during the time when the water was contaminated, you might be eligible to file a lawsuit and claim compensation.

What are some of the toxic chemicals found in Camp Lejeune?

Trichloroethylene

TCE (trichloroethylene) is a solvent used in many industries, including dry cleaning, and can be found in adhesives, paint removers, and spot cleaners.

The EPA has classified TCE as a human carcinogen, and it is linked to several types of cancer, including leukemia, breast cancer, and kidney cancer.

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has also released a report stating that TCE exposure can cause non-cancer health effects, such as liver damage, kidney damage, and neurological effects.

Perchloroethylene

PCE is a synthetic dry-cleaning solvent.

When it evaporates, it leaves behind a residue that can be harmful to your health.

Short-term exposure to PCE can cause dizziness, headaches, and nausea.

Long-term exposure can damage your liver, kidneys, and central nervous system.

PCE has also been linked to cancer.

Benzene

Benzene is a chemical compound that is often used as an industrial solvent.

It can be found in crude oil and is a component of gasoline.

Benzene is also used to make other chemicals, including plastics, resins, and synthetic fibres.

Exposure to benzene can cause serious health problems, including cancer.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified benzene as a carcinogen.

Vinyl chloride

Vinyl chloride is a synthetic chemical used in the production of PVC plastic.

It is also used as a solvent in the production of many other chemicals.

This chemical is classified as a carcinogen, meaning that it has been linked to cancer in humans.

Symptoms of vinyl chloride exposure are similar to the other chemicals mentioned earlier and include liver damage, skin lesions, and cancers of the liver, kidney, brain, and lungs.

Long-term exposure to this chemical can also cause neurological damage, including memory loss and impaired coordination.

There is no safe level of exposure to this chemical, and even short-term exposure can be dangerous.

Is there scientific and medical evidence that links toxic chemicals found in Camp Lejeune to these diseases?

Though you may be familiar with the list of diseases caused or related to Camp Lejeune contamination, you may not know how the toxic chemicals found in the water at Camp Lejeune are linked to these diseases.

Here is a brief explanation of the scientific and medical evidence that links these chemicals to the specific health conditions outlined by the VA and what these health conditions entail.

Leukemia

This is the most common childhood cancer.

The cause is unknown, but environmental factors are linked to some cases.

Exposure to certain chemicals has been linked to an increased risk of leukemia.

One such chemical is benzene, which is found in gasoline and other petroleum products.

Benzene exposure can occur through inhalation or skin contact.

Benzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is a well-known and researched carcinogen that was found in the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune and has been linked to all kinds of leukemia.

Studies have revealed that being exposed to other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) – like trichloroethylene (TCE) and other dry cleaning solvents – also increases the risk of leukemia.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

This is a form of cancer that attacks the lymphatic system, which is part of the body’s immune system.

The lymphatic system includes the spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and lymph nodes.

The cause of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is unknown, but it’s thought to be caused by a combination of factors, including viruses, bacteria, and certain chemicals.

There is a strong link between non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and exposure to certain chemicals, such as benzene, solvents, pesticides, and herbicides.

Studies have shown that people who are exposed to chemicals like Benzene, TCE and PCE (all found in water at Camp Lejeune) have a higher risk of developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Bladder cancer

This is a type of cancer that begins to grow in the bladder.

Bladder cancer can occur anywhere in the urinary tract, but it most commonly affects the lining of the bladder.

It is one of the most common cancers affecting men.

Other risk factors include exposure to certain toxic chemicals, such as those that are used in the manufacture of rubber, textiles, and leather.

Perchloroethylene (PCE) exposure has also been correlated with an increased chance of developing this cancer, and multiple studies have been conducted on those exposed to PCE, like industrial workers, showing the positive correlation between the two.

Kidney cancer

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is another chemical found in Camp Lejeune’s water.

It is a solvent used in dry cleaning, metal degreasing, and as an adhesive.

TCE is a well-researched carcinogen and has a strong causal link to kidney cancer.

Parkinson’s disease

This neurodegenerative disorder most often affects people over the age of 50, and can lead to tremors, muscle rigidity, slowed movement, and impaired balance and coordination.

Exposure to certain toxins found at Camp Lejeune, such as TCE, has been linked to a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

Veterans who served at Camp Lejeune and later developed Parkinson’s may be eligible for disability benefits from the VA.

Multiple Myeloma

When someone has multiple myeloma, plasma cells which are cancerous accumulate in the bone marrow, leaving no room for healthy blood cells.

This can cause a decrease in red blood cells, which can lead to fatigue and anemia.

It can also cause a drop in white blood cells, leading to a higher risk of infection.

In addition, the cancerous plasma cells can produce abnormal antibodies, which can cause kidney problems.

It’s a difficult and expensive cancer to treat.

TCE and benzene, two (2) of the chemicals found in the water at Camp Lejeune, have been linked as one of the causes for residents who developed this cancer.

Do I need a lawyer for Camp Lejeune water contamination?

You are not required to have a lawyer file a claim, but it is highly recommended to seek advice from Camp Lejeune lawyers.

The process of filing a claim can be complicated and time-consuming, and Camp Lejeune attorneys can help you navigate the process and ensure that you receive the maximum amount of compensation to which you are entitled.

If you have been diagnosed with one of the covered diseases, you may be eligible for benefits from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Department.

However, the VA does not automatically provide compensation for these conditions – you must file a claim and prove that your illness is related to the contaminated Camp Lejeune water supply.

Camp Lejeune lawyers can help you gather the necessary evidence and build a strong claim.

What’s more, the application process can be convoluted, and it is important to make sure that you submit all of the required documentation.

Having Camp Lejeune lawyers on hand can help you ensure that your application is complete and accurate and can help you navigate the appeals process if your claim is denied.

A lawyer can also help you file a claim under the CLJA, which provides for death benefits to be paid to the surviving spouse, child, or parent of a veteran who died as a result of one of the qualifying illnesses associated with the water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

The Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit is an important step in providing justice for the people who were impacted by the contamination at Camp Lejeune.

It is hoped that the Camp Lejeune lawsuit will help to hold the government accountable for what happened and to prevent situations like this from occurring again in the future.

What’s more, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act will help to ensure that the people who were affected by the contamination of the Camp Lejeune water supply receive the compensation they deserve.

Although no amount of money can atone for the loss of life or human suffering, the CLJA will at least provide some measure of justice for the victims of this tragedy.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the Camp Lejeune Water contamination lawsuit about?

    The Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuit is a class action lawsuit that was filed on behalf of those who were affected by the water contamination.

    The lawsuit essentially alleges that the United States government knew about the water contamination but still failed to take adequate steps to protect those who were exposed.

    The plaintiffs are seeking compensation for their injuries, including medical expenses, lost wages, and suffering.

  • Why was the Camp Lejeune Lawsuit a multidistrict litigation class action lawsuit?

    Multidistrict litigation is often used in cases where there are many plaintiffs with similar claims but who live in different areas throughout the country, and this is what occurred with the Camp Lejeune claims.

    The Camp Lejeune class action lawsuit was multidistrict litigation (MDL) because it consolidated numerous individual lawsuits that shared common legal issues.

    MDLs are used when there are a large number of plaintiffs with similar claims against the same defendants.

    By consolidating the lawsuits into one MDL, the court is able to efficiently manage the cases and avoid duplicative discovery and other pretrial procedures.

    The Camp Lejeune class action lawsuit was filed against the United States government and several private companies that operated water treatment facilities at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina.

    The plaintiffs alleged that they had been exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune for many years and that this exposure had caused various health problems, including cancer.

  • What is the settlement for a Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuit?

    There is no average Camp Lejeune settlement for a Camp Lejeune water contamination claim because each case is unique.

    The amount of compensation you may be eligible to receive will depend on a variety of different factors, including the intensity of your illnesses or injuries, the number of economic damages you have incurred, and whether you are a veteran or a civilian.

    For example, some Camp Lejeune Lawyers suggest that a veteran who has developed cancer as a result of the contamination may be eligible to receive more compensation than a civilian with lesser health problems.

  • How long will it take to settle a Camp Lejeune lawsuit?

    Although the Camp Lejeune Justice Act was signed into law by President Biden on August 10th 2022, everyone who files a claim may not receive compensation at the same time.

    It may take years for all eligible claimants to be compensated, but there is now a procedure in place to deal with each claim.

    If you have been diagnosed with a qualifying disease and have evidence to support your claim, you should contact a lawyer as soon as possible to discuss your options.

    You can also use our chatbot to get a clear case evaluation.

  • Who is the VA, and what responsibility do they have?

    The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is responsible for providing healthcare services to veterans and their families.

    They also have a responsibility to ensure that these healthcare services are safe and effective.

    The VA is aware of the potential health risks associated with exposure to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune and asserts that they are committed to providing quality healthcare to veterans and their relatives.

    In light of this, the VA has taken some steps to ensure that those who may have been exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune receive the care and benefits they deserve.

    The VA has established a health registry evaluation form to gather information about the health of veterans and their family members who were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

    The registry is used to identify veterans and family members who may be eligible for healthcare benefits.

    They also provide a compensation and pension benefit program for disabled veterans and their families.

  • What cancers are associated with Camp Lejeune water contamination?

    There are several types of cancer that have been linked to exposure to VOCs in drinking water, including:

    • Breast cancer
    • Kidney cancer
    • Liver cancer
    • Rectum and prostrate cancer
    • Leukemia

    These are just some of the cancers that have been associated with the water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    Other related diseases include Parkinson’s, multiple myeloma and kidney-related diseases.

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer and were stationed at Camp Lejeune during the time when the water was contaminated, you may be entitled to compensation.

    If you’re unsure whether or not you qualify for compensation, use our chatbot for an instant case evaluation.

  • What illnesses are covered under the Camp Lejeune lawsuit, and how is this decided?

    Some diseases are said to be directly caused by Camp Lejeune contamination, whereas others may be linked to it, and this difference can affect individual cases and claims.

    The VA (Department of Veteran’s Affairs) have decided that some of these illnesses have a ‘presumptive service connection’, meaning that if you have certain illnesses and diseases, and were stationed at Camp Lejeune during the relevant time period, then it is presumed that your condition was caused by the water contamination.

    Other illnesses have been classified by the ATSDR ( Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry) as backed or supported by enough evidence to correlate the condition to exposure to certain chemicals from Camp Lejeune.

    Extensive testing and research have been done to study the health effects of contamination in the drinking water at Camp Lejeune.

    The evidence collected supports a causal relationship between adverse health conditions and exposure to these contaminants.

    The VA has presumptive service connection for these eight (8) conditions:

    • Bladder cancer
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Kidney cancer
    • Liver cancer
    • Multiple myeloma
    • Aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes
    • Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
    • Adult leukemia

    These 8 health conditions are on the official VA list. Although other health conditions may be connected to the Camp Lejeune water contamination, more extensive medical records and evidence are needed to confirm these claims.

    If you have a medical condition not listed by the VA or ATSDR but think it might be connected to Camp Lejeune, you are still allowed to file a claim.

  • What are neurobehavioral effects?

    The term “neurobehavioral” refers to the way in which the nervous system and behavior are interconnected.

    This includes cognitive function, mood, and motor skills.

    Neurobehavioral effects can range from mild to severe and can include the following:

    • Attention deficit disorder (ADD)
    • Attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD)
    • Autism spectrum disorder
    • Learning disabilities
    • Mood disorders
    • Anxiety disorders
    • Depression
    • Psychotic disorders
    • Memory disorders
    • Parkinson’s disease

    These are just some of the neurobehavioral effects that have been linked to exposure to VOCs, and although they are not on the official list by the VA, they are still being studied.

    Not sure if you’re eligible for compensation under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act?

    Find out instantly with our chatbot below.

  • How many people died or developed illnesses due to Camp Lejeune water contamination?

    In total, 8,964 people who had resided at Camp Lejeune from 1953 to 1987 died between 1979 and 2008.

    However, the number of fatalities that resulted from direct exposure to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune is unknown.

    According to some estimates, more than a million Marines and their families were exposed to this water at Camp Lejeune during the early 1950s and late 1980s.

    It is estimated that roughly 24,000 renal cancer cases, 50,000 breast cancer cases and 28,000 bladder cancer cases have been caused by toxic chemicals from Camp Lejeune.

    In addition, thousands of Parkinson’s disease cases, as well as birth defects and other health problems, have been traced back to exposure at the Camp.

  • Can you file a Camp Lejeune claim if your illness isn't on the official VA list?

    Absolutely.

    If you worked or lived at Camp Lejeune for 30 days between 1953 and 1987 and have been diagnosed with a serious disease, you can file a claim even if your illness isn’t on the list.

    Toxic chemicals and VOCs have been linked to many different diseases and conditions, all of which have had tragic consequences for those affected.

    The list of diseases above is not exhaustive but does represent some of the more common conditions seen in individuals who came in contact with contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

    So even if your particular illness isn’t on the list, it may still be connected to the Camp Lejeune water contamination, and you can definitely still file a claim.

    To do this, it’s essential that you gather as much evidence as possible to support your claim.

    This includes your complete medical history, records of your time spent at Camp Lejeune, and any other documentation that may be relevant.

    An experienced lawyer can help you put together a stronger case and get the compensation you need.

  • What is the 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act?

    In August 2022, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act was finally passed by Congress.

    This act provides health care benefits and compensation to veterans and their families who were impacted by the contamination at Camp Lejeune.

    The benefits include healthcare, disability compensation, and death benefits.

    It’s part of a bigger act called Honoring our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxins.

    This act was created to provide benefits and compensation to veterans exposed to various toxins, including Agent Orange, burn pits, and Gulf War Syndrome.

  • What is the Honoring Our PACT Act?

    The Honoring Our PACT Act is a bill that will retroactively extend the benefits of the Veterans’ Compensation and Health Care Improvement Act to veterans and their relatives exposed to toxic chemicals and other substances during their years of military service.

    The bill will also provide health care and disability benefits for these veterans and their families.

    The Honoring Our PACT Act will provide much-needed relief to veterans and their families who have been negatively impacted by the Camp Lejeune water contamination, as it will ensure that these citizens receive the benefits they deserve, and it will help to hold the government accountable for the contamination of the water at Camp Lejeune.

  • Why has the Camp Lejeune case taken such a long time to be resolved?

    The Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit was finally passed in 2022 after years of waiting.

    There are a variety of factors that have contributed to the Camp Lejeune case taking such a long time to be resolved.

    First, it took a long time for the government to recognize that there was a problem with the water at Camp Lejeune.

    It wasn’t until around the 1980s that the government began investigating the Camp Lejeune water contamination.

    What’s more, claims from the Camp Lejeune victims only started coming through in the early 2000s.

    Second, the process of gathering strong evidence for the Camp Lejeune lawsuit was long and convoluted.

    The nature of the contamination means that it can take years for health problems to manifest themselves, making it difficult to determine who is affected and to what extent.

    In addition, the government was slow to act on the problem once they did recognize it.

    They dragged their feet in cleaning up the water and didn’t provide immediate compensation to the Camp Lejeune water contamination victims.

  • How do I file a VA claim for Camp Lejeune water contamination?

    Any plaintiffs wishing to file a Camp Lejeune civil lawsuit must first file an administrative claim with the Navy, similarly to how one would under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

    According to the CLJA (Camp Lejeune Justice Act), these claims must be decided upon within 6 months, or the claimant has the right to sue.

    Then, all Camp Lejeune administrative claims need to be sent to the Office of the Judge Advocate General of the Navy’s Tort Claims Unit (JAG TCU). The JAG TCU will oversee and handle these specific Camp Lejeune lawsuits that come under Department of Justice control.

    JAG has created a Camp Lejeune Justice Act claim form to be utilized when filing any new Camp Lejeune water contamination cases, which outlines the information needed from claimants.

    Two (2) main pieces of evidence are required to file a VA claim for Camp Lejeune water contamination:

    • First of all, they must show proof that they were Camp Lejeune residents or employed in Camp Lejeune.
    • Secondly, they need proof of a diagnosis of a condition or disease that can be traced back to the Camp Lejeune water contamination.

    In order to qualify for Camp Lejeune Justice Act benefits, veterans must have documentary proof of residency at Camp Lejeune, and family members must have additional documentation establishing their connection to the veteran (e.g., marriage license, birth certificate, etc.).

    If you were a civilian working at Camp Lejeune, you would need to provide documentation such as pay stubs, tax returns or a work history report.

    On the other hand, veterans can request their Official Military Personnel File with a DD214 form, which will contain dates of service and residency at Camp Lejeune.

  • What are Camp Lejeune wrongful death claims?

    The CLJA (Camp Lejeune Justice Act) provides for death benefits to be paid to the surviving spouse, child, or parent of a veteran who died directly due to one of the qualifying illnesses associated with the Camp Lejeune water contamination.

    These benefits are paid in on top of any other benefits that the family may be entitled to, such as life insurance or Social Security.

    To qualify, the family must show that the veteran’s death was caused by a qualifying illness and that the veteran came into contact with the Camp Lejeune water contamination.

  • Is there a deadline for filing a Camp Lejeune water contamination claim?

    There is a two-year statute of limitations for filing a claim under the Camp Lejeune Justice Act.

    This means that there is only a two-year window starting from the enactment of the recent law.

    So, all Camp Lejeune Justice Act cases must be started by filing an administrative complaint with the Navy JAG within two years after the law goes into effect.

    However, if you don’t discover your injury or illness until after that date, then you cannot bring a claim under the CLJA – this was an unfair modification made to the law.

    Essentially, if you notice symptoms or develop a health issue after August 10th 2024, you will not be eligible for any form of Camp Lejeune Justice Act benefits.

  • How much money will Camp Lejeune victims get?

    The amount of money that victims will receive from the Camp Lejeune water contamination lawsuit will depend on a number of elements, including the severity of their illness, whether they are able to prove causation, and whether they are eligible for benefits under the CLJA.

    According to estimates, around $6.7 billion will be paid out in Camp Lejeune settlements to victims of Camp Lejeune toxic exposure, with claimants receiving anywhere from $25,000 to upwards of $1 million depending on the severity of the illness they contracted.

    In general, those suffering from cancer or Parkinson’s disease will be given a larger sum of money than those diagnosed with other eligible health problems.

Written By:
Jessie Paluch
Jessie Paluch

Experienced Attorney & Legal SaaS CEO

With over 25 years of legal experience, Jessie is an Illinois lawyer, a CPA, and a mother of three.  She spent the first decade of her career working as an international tax attorney at Deloitte.

In 2009, Jessie co-founded her own law firm with her husband – which has scaled to over 30 employees since its conception.

In 2016, Jessie founded TruLaw, which allows her to collaborate with attorneys and legal experts across the United States on a daily basis. This hypervaluable network of experts is what enables her to share reliable legal information with her readers!

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