Gum Disease from Suboxone: Symptoms and Solutions

Key Takeaways:

  • Suboxone, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder, has been linked to an increased risk of gum disease and other dental health issues, even in patients with no prior history of dental problems.
  • The FDA issued a drug safety communication warning about the risk of dental adverse outcomes associated with buprenorphine medicines like Suboxone, including tooth decay, cavities, oral infections, and tooth loss.
  • Patients taking Suboxone can reduce their risk of developing gum disease by practicing good oral hygiene and seeing a dentist regularly.

Overview of Gum Disease from Suboxone

This page will provide an overview of gum disease from suboxone, FDA warnings on dental problems with suboxone, treatment of suboxone-related gum disease, and much more.

Gum Disease from Suboxone Symptoms and Solutions

Intro to Gum Disease from Suboxone

Common dental issues associated with Suboxone use include:

  • Severe tooth decay and cavities
  • Oral infections and abscesses
  • Gum inflammation and bleeding
  • Tooth loss and the need for extractions

If you have experienced gum disease, tooth decay, or other dental problems after taking Suboxone, you may be entitled to legal compensation.

Contact TruLawsuit Info using the chat on this page to receive an instant case evaluation to see if you qualify to file a Suboxone gum disease lawsuit.

Table of Contents

Symptoms of Gum Disease Caused by Suboxone

Suboxone, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder, has been linked to an increased risk of gum disease and other dental health issues.

Patients taking Suboxone may experience a range of symptoms related to oral health problems, even if they have no prior history of dental disease.

Tooth Decay and Cavities from Suboxone

One of the most common dental adverse events associated with Suboxone use is tooth decay and cavities.

The acidic nature of the Suboxone sublingual film or tablet can weaken tooth enamel, making teeth more susceptible to dental caries.

Signs of tooth decay and cavities in Suboxone patients include:

  • Tooth sensitivity to hot, cold, or sweet foods and drinks
  • Visible holes or pits in the teeth
  • Brown, black, or white staining on the tooth surface
  • Pain when biting down or chewing

If left untreated, tooth decay can progress to more severe dental health issues, such as infections and tooth extractions.

Oral Infections Related to Suboxone Use

Suboxone use can also increase the risk of oral infections, mainly if tooth erosion and gum disease are not addressed promptly.

As bacteria build up in the mouth, they can cause infections in the oral tissues, teeth, and jawbone.

Common oral infections associated with buprenorphine medications include:

  • Gingivitis: inflammation of the gums, causing redness, swelling, and bleeding
  • Periodontitis: advanced gum disease that can lead to tooth loss and jawbone damage
  • Dental Abscesses: pus-filled pockets that form in the gums or teeth due to bacterial infection

Patients experiencing symptoms of oral infections should seek a dentist visit immediately to prevent further damage to their dental health.

FDA Warning on Dental Problems with Suboxone

In January 2022, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a drug safety communication about the risk of dental adverse outcomes associated with buprenorphine medicines dissolved in the mouth, such as Suboxone.

The FDA noted the importance of addressing these dental issues while continuing to recognize the benefits of Suboxone in treating opioid dependence.

Buprenorphine Medicines Pose Risk to Teeth

Buprenorphine products like Suboxone can cause significant dental problems, including tooth decay, cavities, oral infections, and even total tooth loss.

These risks are particularly concerning because they can occur even in patients with no prior history of dental issues.

The FDA’s findings were based on several sources:

  1. Adverse event reports submitted to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database
  2. Published case reports in medical literature, such as the Primary Care Companion
  3. Reviews of post-marketing safety data

The FDA’s analysis of these data sources underscores the need for patients and health professionals to know the potential dental risks associated with sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone exposure.

Benefits Still Outweigh Risks, Says FDA

Despite the dental risks associated with Suboxone, the FDA emphasized that the benefits of these medications in treating opioid misuse still outweigh the risks.

Buprenorphine treatment plays a crucial role in medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder, helping patients manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings.

The FDA recommended several steps to mitigate dental risks while maintaining access to oral buprenorphine:

  1. Updating prescribing information and patient medication guides to include warnings about dental risks
  2. Encouraging patients to inform their dentists about their Suboxone use and to schedule regular dental checkups
  3. Advising health care professionals to counsel patients on proper oral hygiene practices while taking Suboxone

By working closely with their health professionals and dentists, patients can minimize their risk of suboxone tooth decay and other oral health problems while continuing to benefit from buprenorphine treatment.

Preventing Gum Disease While Taking Suboxone

Patients prescribed Suboxone can take proactive steps to reduce their risk of developing gum disease and other dental adverse events.

Suboxone users can maintain optimal dental health by implementing good oral hygiene practices and working closely with their dental care team.

Dental Hygiene Tips for Suboxone Patients

Proper dental hygiene is essential for preventing dental disease and tooth erosion in Suboxone patients.

Patients should work with their dentist to develop a customized oral care plan for their unique needs.

Key dental hygiene practices for Suboxone patients include:

  • Brushing teeth twice daily with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque and food particles between teeth
  • Using an antibacterial mouthwash to reduce harmful bacteria in the mouth
  • Drinking plenty of water to help rinse away acid and promote saliva production

After taking Suboxone, patients should wait at least one hour before brushing their teeth to minimize damage to the softened enamel and maximize absorption of the remaining medication.

Seeing a Dentist Regularly on Suboxone

Regular dental checkups are crucial for Suboxone patients to detect and treat dental disease and other oral health issues early.

Patients should inform their dentist about their buprenorphine medicine use and any symptoms they may be experiencing.

During routine dental visits, Suboxone patients can expect:

  1. Thorough examination of the teeth, gums, and mouth for signs of decay, infection, or other issues
  2. Professional cleaning to remove plaque and tartar buildup
  3. X-rays to detect cavities or other problems not visible during the exam
  4. Personalized recommendations for at-home oral care and any necessary treatments

By working closely with their dentist, Suboxone patients can prevent worsening dental health and maintain healthy smiles.

Treating Suboxone-Related Gum Disease

If gum disease or other dental problems develop in Suboxone patients, prompt treatment is essential to prevent further damage and restore oral health.

Depending on the severity of the issue, various dental procedures may be necessary.

Restorative Dental Procedures for Suboxone Users

For patients with permanent tooth decay or cavities caused by Suboxone, restorative dental procedures can help repair the damage and prevent further deterioration.

These procedures aim to save the natural tooth whenever possible.

Common restorative treatments for Suboxone-related dental problems include:

  • Fillings: Used to repair cavities and prevent further decay
  • Crowns: Placed over damaged or weakened teeth to restore strength and appearance
  • Root Canals: Performed to remove infected tooth pulp and save the natural tooth
  • Dental Implants: Used to replace missing teeth with artificial roots and crowns

Suboxone patients should work closely with their dentist to determine the most appropriate treatment plan for their individual needs.

When Tooth Extraction is Needed on Suboxone

In some cases, tooth damage caused by Suboxone use may be too severe to repair with restorative procedures.

When a tooth is extensively decayed or infected, extraction may be necessary to prevent the spread of infection and protect overall dental health.

Situations that may require tooth extractions in Suboxone patients include:

  1. Severe tooth decay that has reached the tooth pulp
  2. Advanced gum disease that has caused the tooth to loosen
  3. Dental abscesses that cannot be treated with root canal therapy
  4. Teeth that have been badly damaged by injury or trauma

After tooth extractions, patients may opt for dental implants, bridges, or dentures to replace the missing tooth and restore proper function and appearance.

TruLawsuit Info: Legal Options for Suboxone Patients

Patients who have experienced dental caries or other oral health problems due to Suboxone use may be entitled to legal compensation.

TruLawsuit Info is dedicated to helping Suboxone patients understand their legal rights and options.

Suboxone Lawsuits for Undisclosed Gum Disease Risk

Many Suboxone patients have filed lawsuits against the medication’s manufacturers, alleging that they failed to adequately warn about the risk of dental caries and other oral health problems.

These lawsuits argue that patients were not given the information they needed to make informed consent about their buprenorphine treatment.

Suboxone lawsuits typically involve allegations such as:

  • Failure to warn about the risk of dental problems associated with sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone exposure
  • Misrepresentation of the safety and effectiveness of Suboxone sublingual film or tablets
  • Negligence in the design, manufacture, and marketing of buprenorphine products

Patients who have suffered suboxone rot or other serious dental problems after taking Suboxone may be eligible to join existing lawsuits or file their legal claims.

Filing a Suboxone Gum Disease Lawsuit

If you have experienced dental disease or other oral health issues after taking Suboxone, TruLawsuit Info can help you explore your legal options.

Our experienced attorneys can review your case, explain your rights, and guide you through filing a Suboxone lawsuit.

The steps in filing a Suboxone gum disease lawsuit typically include:

  1. Gathering medical records and other evidence to support your claim, such as documentation of extensive dental work
  2. Filing a complaint against the Suboxone manufacturer in the appropriate court
  3. Participating in the discovery process to gather additional evidence and testimony
  4. Negotiating a settlement or proceeding to trial to seek compensation for your permanent dental damage

By working with a knowledgeable Suboxone lawyer, you can seek the compensation you deserve for your dental adverse events and hold the manufacturer accountable for their failure to warn about these risks.

If your teeth feel sore or you have experienced worsening dental health after taking Suboxone, contact TruLawsuit Info today to learn more about your legal options amid the ongoing opioid crisis.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Is there a Suboxone class action lawsuit in 2024?

    No, individual claims are consolidating under multidistrict litigation.

    Creating the Suboxone MDL is a significant step towards a potential global resolution of these claims.

    Bellwether trials will assess the strength of the allegations and gauge potential Suboxone settlement values.

  • What are the common symptoms of gum disease caused by Suboxone?

    Patients taking Suboxone may experience tooth sensitivity, visible holes or pits in the teeth, staining on the tooth surface, and pain when biting or chewing.

    These symptoms can progress to more severe dental health issues, including infections and tooth extractions if left untreated.

  • What did the FDA warn about dental problems with Suboxone?

    In January 2022, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a drug safety communication warning about the risk of dental adverse outcomes associated with buprenorphine medicines dissolved in the mouth, such as Suboxone.

    The FDA noted that these risks can occur even in patients with no prior history of dental issues.

  • How can Suboxone patients prevent gum disease?

    Suboxone patients can reduce their risk of developing gum disease by implementing good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing twice daily with fluoride toothpaste, flossing daily, using an antibacterial mouthwash, and drinking plenty of water.

    Additionally, patients should work closely with their dentist to develop a customized oral care plan and schedule regular dental checkups.

  • What restorative dental procedures are available for Suboxone users with tooth decay?

    For Suboxone patients with permanent tooth decay or cavities, restorative dental procedures such as fillings, crowns, root canals, and dental implants can help repair the damage and prevent further deterioration.

    Patients should work closely with their dentist to determine the most appropriate treatment plan for their needs.

  • How can TruLawsuit Info assist Suboxone patients with legal options?

    TruLawsuit Info can help Suboxone patients who have experienced dental caries or other oral health problems understand their legal rights and options.

    Their experienced attorneys can review cases, guide patients through filing a Suboxone lawsuit, and seek compensation for dental adverse events caused by the manufacturer’s failure to warn about these risks.

Written By:
Jessie Paluch
Jessie Paluch

Experienced Attorney & Legal SaaS CEO

With over 25 years of legal experience, Jessie is an Illinois lawyer, a CPA, and a mother of three.  She spent the first decade of her career working as an international tax attorney at Deloitte.

In 2009, Jessie co-founded her own law firm with her husband – which has scaled to over 30 employees since its conception.

In 2016, Jessie founded TruLaw, which allows her to collaborate with attorneys and legal experts across the United States on a daily basis. This hypervaluable network of experts is what enables her to share reliable legal information with her readers!

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Here, at Tru Lawsuit Info, we’re committed to helping victims get the justice they deserve.

To do this, we actively work to connect them with attorneys who are experts in litigating cases similar to theirs.

Would you like our help?